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  1. Fangirl: Buy Fangirl by Rowell Rainbow at Low Price in India | pemilusydney.org.au
  2. 350 Badass Maya Angelou Quotes That Will Blow Your Mind
  3. Mum is victim of vile racial slurs from bike-riding gang in Peatmoor

This website aspires to be a beautiful and interactive resource for skeptics and believers alike to explore some of the more negative aspects of holy books, such as Bible contradictions, biblical inerrancy and the Bible as a source of morality. It was heavily inspired by the Reason Project's poster of biblical contradictions , which in turn was inspired by Chris Harrison's Bible Visualizations. Many of the contradictions above stem from a literal interpretation of the stories in the Bible biblical inerrancy. Some verses may be mistranslations, allegories, exaggerations, etc and can be interpreted in the context of the society in which they were written, rewritten, or otherwise modified over time, while others are very clear contradictions.

I hope to show that while the Bible may have much to offer us, biblical inerrancy and morality are not what it offers. Without inerrancy it's simple to see that we just do not know which parts are the word or will of God. Basing our morality on vile, disgusting stories from a long-forgotten era of humanity in a part of the world many have never even seen seems silly to me.

What the Bible does offer us is an amazing look into humanity, our past, our desires and our fears. This website and domain cost money, so please consider making a donation. Your donations keep this website running for everyone to enjoy, and prevent annoying non-relevant ads. Book: All. Type: All. The other Stephenson-trope of hugely bloated and meandering prose is in full effect. Overall, while it has interesting elements and good characters in the first half, the characters in the bitworld are only caricatures at best and that whole sequence I found quite disappointing.

I'd like to give a little more than 3 stars but it's hard. Generally though, 5 stars for meatspace, 2 stars for Bitspace. This seems to be the general consensus of reviews, and while I hate to agree with consensus, it's hard to find fault. I suppose like others I completely missed the point because the stories of Bitspace I found to just be so uninteresting, derivative, and boring. I guess the idea that the human mind would not be able to escape the trappings of human experience is interesting, b I'd like to give a little more than 3 stars but it's hard.

I guess the idea that the human mind would not be able to escape the trappings of human experience is interesting, but I don't feel it was really explored. It was kind of like the entire point of Bitspace was to recreate the creation myths of the past. But, I was just so completely overwhelmingly bored. The long middle chapters about the journey of Adam and Eve I had to just start skipping entire paragraphs of text for want of literally anything interesting happening.

The final act which people have mentioned being bad I actually at least found more fun to read, if still also pretty rote and kind of lame. I don't really want to go about too many spoilers, but I was really disappointed in what he chose to explore,and I feel it left a lot of questions. So, some spoilers ahead.

Second, what was El doing other than being a "bad" god? He seemed to have almost literally no plan. I get it, he wanted the resources for himself, hence enslaving so many souls to low cycle drudgery or just hibernation in the hive. But, it really doesn't make a lot of sense.

In the real world he talked so much of what he would want to do absent the bounds of physical laws This is really weak sauce. Probably the worst villain of any Stephenson book. Third, the entire idea of a quasi-eternal life should be upending the physical world. And yet, we only get very narrow views of what is going on with the characters, who make less and less sense as the book goes on. I understand that this may be part of the point. But I didn't like it. Fourth, we have a subtitle "Dodge in Hell" but get almost literally nothing about Dodge's experience other than his ability to create.

I don't know, I thought maybe we would have more about his journey and the journey of awakening consciousness. The only enjoyable thing about the entire finish is the idea that Meatspace in this book was actually always another bitworld, and it was bitworlds all the way down going back who knows how long. But even this is pulled from like, three lines of the book and I'm probably over-extrapolating.

I love Stephenson generally and I like his prose. I don't need him to write exceptionally complicated claptrap to be satisfied. But, I think he really missed here. Jun 11, Greg rated it it was ok. Fall is occasionally exceptionally poignant, when Neal Stephenson chooses to engage with his near-future real world, with the wide implications of AR, automation, post-truth, culture-divides and even the implications of running an after-life simulation. Most of the time, it's bogged down in it's own self-mythology created from the patrons of the transhumanist afterlife, with a few "I kid you not" moments of old-gods resembling greeks being ousted by judo-christian replacements souls complete wit Fall is occasionally exceptionally poignant, when Neal Stephenson chooses to engage with his near-future real world, with the wide implications of AR, automation, post-truth, culture-divides and even the implications of running an after-life simulation.

Stephenson seems quite preoccupied with his rather-bizarrely-paper-thin allegories. The bigger crime is it's just not that interesting. I suppose Stephenson purposely is making a point for how much humans are trapped in their own frames of reference, and the commonality of myth is an outgrown of our limited conceptions but man I just wanted to get it over with.

I was always waiting for the book to return back to the real-world instead of the snoozy VR world. Meatspace is good near future sci-fi, bitspace is boring fantasy, spanning eons and hundreds of pages for lame-duck lore. The theme of the year for me is what ever happened to editors? Winslow, Elroy and Stephenson have all recently published giant manuscripts in which the novel itself i. Mar 27, Jon Lewis rated it liked it. I will have a full review on LA Books, but this is a mixed bag. There are two great plot lines that are resolved, but incomplete to my tastes. Apr 25, Carrie Nellis Crisp rated it really liked it.

Johnny Mnemonic meets Matrix then Adam and Eve. This was well written but long. I found myself writing notes so I wouldn't forget if I had to put the book down for a few days. This is not a easy read however it's a very good story and this will keep you occupied for a good while.. Jun 14, Nooilforpacifists rated it it was ok Shelves: science-fiction , fantasy. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is a death spiral into boredom. It starts off with a technological bang, and ends as a whimper of a Monty Python farce.

The idea is good—and a masterful triple entendre. A Seattle multibillionaire named Dodge dies, and his will turns out to demand cryogenic freezing of his body—or whatever better technology is available at date of death. Clever, Neal. The quest seems endless, although it covers only about a quarter of the book. That says everything. Neal Stephenson's last solo novel Seveneves featured a major narrative switch in the last or so pages. It put a lot of readers off, but I liked it. It was a bold choice and for me, at least, it paid off.

Fall has a similar narrative change but presents it much more gradually as an evolution in the story. The early sections are about about the internet and the ways it allows us to create our own realities and morphs into a book about the planes of existence. It goes from a classic Stephenson Neal Stephenson's last solo novel Seveneves featured a major narrative switch in the last or so pages.

It goes from a classic Stephenson digressive techno-thriller to a digital take on classical mythology to a full-on fantasy novel. It's ambitious and its got big ideas. The problem is the fantasy section a whopping third of the novel is a colossal bore. Stephenson doesn't land it. The fantasy section introduces dozens of new character and plot threads and feels absolutely endless. It's a shame because Stephenson ideas about the successive states of existence is fascinating. He's famous for his long digressions and I suppose that editors have learned that's part of what makes him a writer that readers love, but someone along the way probably should have cut about pages from the Bitworld section.

It's a shame because so much of the book is genuinely great.

Jun 07, Suddenly Life rated it it was ok. You have to really be a fan of Stephenson's style to like this book. What's his style like, you ask? Well, one of the most prominent tips given to writers is "Just write! Writers usually do re-writes, where the senseless rants get turned into plot-related developments. Stephenson seems to have had no such stage in writing this book. The amount of nonsensical, plot agnostic, kind of babble between incidents is truly astounding for the author You have to really be a fan of Stephenson's style to like this book.

The amount of nonsensical, plot agnostic, kind of babble between incidents is truly astounding for the author in general, but particularly so in this book.

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Pages upon pages where nothing happens and you're forced to trudge through thickets of contrived notions and thoughts of the unfortunate protagonist. The it gets a little interesting when the protagonist's progeny is involved, but then comes the afterlife, which is also where I thought I was experiencing it myself. I finished the book today, after about 3 weeks, gasping for breath. Some of the ideas were somewhat interesting, most of them were either silly or simply boring. But even silly ideas can be entertaining when written well - this is not the case here at all.

Thoroughly disappointed. Jun 11, Daniel Kenefick rated it really liked it. Drags in places, but I liked the ending, and there are some very interesting connections to his other work Which you don't have to have read to enjoy and tons interesting ideas to keep pushing you along. By the ending, I was reading an entirely different book than when I started, but it still kept that uncut thread that was essentially "Fall" throughout. Jun 12, Peter rated it really liked it Shelves: philosophy , science , fiction-science. Neal Stephenson has long been one of my favorite authors— Cryptonomicon and The Baroque Trilogy were real hoots based on a technology platform: in the first, Stephenson explored the creation of cryptocurrency in an action-filled WWII setting; in the second he explored the 17th century Enlightenment with a penis-mutilated pirate "Half Cock Jack" as the key character.

Each was a fascinating tour de force that I enjoyed for its erudition, its humor and its zaniness. Even today t Neal Stephenson has long been one of my favorite authors— Cryptonomicon and The Baroque Trilogy were real hoots based on a technology platform: in the first, Stephenson explored the creation of cryptocurrency in an action-filled WWII setting; in the second he explored the 17th century Enlightenment with a penis-mutilated pirate "Half Cock Jack" as the key character.

Even today the Internet what Stephenson calls the Miasma is the carrier of bizarre hoaxes that some idiots judge to be true because there is no evidence that they aren't true; these same yokels also argue that the lack of evidence against their pet idea is evidence of a hoax.

So we are already in the world of "false news" and of public over-response to information tidbits that makes the slightest whisper into a shout and then a scream. Stephenson will show us our future in his usually hyperbolic fashion. For example, what makes the brain-body link switch off at times, like when one is asleep and dreams of high-activity events like running a race, but the body shows no external signs; or when one is caught in a nightmare and knows it, but cannot wake up.

And, he wonders, can the brain be completely severed from the body, and, for example, scanned and stored into a computer to continue to do its work. Clearly, Dodge is a Big Thinker. Dodge's former employee, best friend and go-to man is Corvallis Kawasaki nicknamed "C-Plus". C-Plus is the Chief Technology Officer of Lyke , a social media company in Seattle that has become "information central" for the internet. When Dodge goes into the hospital for a routine procedure C-Plus accompanies him. And when Dodge comes out brain dead and on a ventilator, C-Plus finds himself the executor of his estate.

He must navigate between the Scylla of family Dodge's niece, Zula and sister Alice and the Charybdis of the Law, all this while divining Dodge's wishes. C-Plus discovers that Dodge made a living will specifying that if he is in his current condition he should be kept alive until his body is frozen at a specific cryogenics company in Washington state.

But that company has folded except for eleven clients whose heads were kept in the deep freeze, thus avoiding the huge expense of permanent freezing of the entire body. Eventually the brains were sliced and diced and the neural connections scanned, but the low resolution made them virtually useless. Dodge's family and lawyers arrive for a meeting at which sister Alice is the resident viper. The questions addressed are what does the living will mean when the cryogenics company has effectively folded, or at least has seriously changed its business model? Are there now better methods of remaining immortal than freezing?

It's clear that until these and other complex questions are resolved, the plug cannot be pulled. And waiting in the wings is the founder of the defunct cryogenics company. Elmo "El" Shepherd is developing a far superior method of eternal life—ion scanning, in which the brain is scanned at extremely fine detail and its "connectome" is reconstructed. El wants Dodge's brain and he's willing to go to any extreme to get it! There is also turmoil going on outside of Dodge's brain issues.

Not only has a shooter killed many people from a high hotel room in Las Vegas, but a nuclear weapon explodes in Moab, Utah, and the terrorists promise more to come. Because Lyke , C-Plus's company, is the primary social medium on which the Moab destruction has been disseminated, C-Plus flies to Moab to investigate. He discovers that both Moab and the Las Vegas massacre are elaborate hoaxes, skillfully constructed to be self-confirming on the Miasma.

But what would be the motive for the hoax? And why would it be initiated on Lyke? C-Plus realizes that the perpetrator was very well financed and wanted to destroy Lyke as well as pervert the Miasma. But who could that perp be? Who does C-Plus know who will go to any length to achieve his goals, and who now wants Dodge's brain but is thwarted by C-Plus?

C-Plus develops a plan to reverse the cyberattack and rescue Lyke 's reputation as a credible source of information. The idea is to discredit the Miasma so completely that people will stop believing anything on it. To do this, bots are programmed to roam the Miasma and plant ludicrous stories—like Moab's destruction—that would then be discredited by other bots.

The resulting flood of discredited information will it's hoped undermine the Miasma. But the plan fails because it underestimated the human need to believe: enough people believed the already discredited stories that they continued to spread. Dodge has died, his brain has been ion-scanned by El, and the circuits have been restored.

But actually utilizing Dodge's brain is still in the future. The Waterhouse-Shaftoe names bring memories of characters from Stephenson's earlier books: Lawrence Pritchard Waterhouse, a WWII cryptographer, anticipator of cryptocurrencies, and the descendant of the 17th century Enlightenment figure Daniel Waterhouse; Bobby Shaftoe, a GI in the war against Japan and the descendent of "Half Cock Jack" Shaftoe, a 17th century pirate with a mutilated penis; in addition Enoch Root, the mysterious and apparently immortal Zelig who seems to be everywhere and everywhen in Stephenson's work, appears.

We expect Root to use the alchemical skills he learned in the 17th century and the gold he found in WWII to once again raise someone from the dead. The Windup Dodge's grand-niece Sophia a reference to the Gnostic god? Initially the activated brain senses only static, but eventually it organizes its thought and DB's awareness grows.

350 Badass Maya Angelou Quotes That Will Blow Your Mind

DB's virtual world takes form into a "material" world of hills, trees, and so forth. As time passes a population of "souls" join DB: these are the brains of those who have died and had their brains uploaded to the Cloud. Sophia develops a method of monitoring these virtual entities by the electrical impulses they generate in the virtual world, a world now called "Bitworld" to differentiate it from our world, Meatspace. It turns out that Dodge's brain thinks of itself as "Egdod.

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Through this device Stephenson is investigating an ancient philosophical question: is there really a material world or is what we experience as "reality" simply a virtual world, a fabrication of our senses. This is pure Stephenson! The Bitworld story builds on a number of themes in myth and folklore. Egdod is the Old God in the virtual afterlife; he gives structure to and shapes the landscape, the "living" things, the weather and so forth that define Bitworld.

As Bitworld develops, it mimics the experiences of Dodge's Brain in Meatspace. When Elmo Shepherd dies, his brain is also scanned and uploaded using superior technology and the New God "El" arrives in Bitworld with greater powers than Egdod. In a battle between those two gods El is the victor and Egdod's activity level dwindles to nothing representing virtual death. Another myth is the Garden of Eden and the creation by God of the first two humans. In the virtual world of uploaded brains, Egdod creates Adam and Eve as two souls that can reproduce to populate the virtual world.

But when El becomes supreme, Adam and Eve are cast out of the Garden of Eden and must wander on the outskirts of their "material" world. El's animosity is because they can reproduce, making them ultimately the dominant group in Bitworld and a major threat because Bitworld is an enormous consumer of computer power and energy. Even the Tower of Babel makes an entrance.

It is an independent construction by the souls of Egdod's Bitworld, and as it grows Egdod resents it and destroys it with a lightning bolt. The Pitch Will the virtual world ever dominate the "real" world? It seems that there are no restrictions on the size and activity level of Bitworld. But there are: Bitworld requires lots of computing power and uses lots of energy. Even with the quantum computers finally perfected, the growth of the material structure of Bitworld and the explosion of the number of souls as humans die and their brains are uploaded begins to swamp the ability of the human world to maintain the Bitworld.

A moral dilemma emerges: is "killing" the Bitworld or limiting its scale tantamount to murder? And so it goes, as Stephenson exercises his remarkable imagination and details a brave new world of cyber-humanity, a world that I, for one, will be glad to miss. Jun 13, vonblubba is currently reading it. Lately I've got problems with long novels, where with "long" I mean "over pages".

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